CLASS

Major in Sociology

Why Sociology?

Sociology gives you the eyes to see the hidden social forces that affect the course of our lives and our communities. Sociology also gives you the scientific methods to understand and engage with the issues of our time: race, poverty, inequality, globalization, immigration, environmental change, gender, power, and many others. With both of these in hand our graduates are prepared to grapple with social problems that affect the entire globe or just one family.

Do you want to see the world more fully? Do you want to create change in your community, in business, in the world? Then start your journey by majoring in sociology.

Sociology Brochure

 

To learn more check out our brochure.

 

What Can I Do With a Sociology Degree?

Sociology graduates can seamlessly transition into social service careers, working with governmental organizations, and non-profits. The skill set that sociology provides is highly prized within the business sector for careers in human resources, public relations, and marketing. Sociology also provides a strong academic base for careers and advanced degrees in law, medicine, social work, and counseling.

Over the course of your education you will develop many “real world” skills including how to ask research questions, find existing evidence, collect your own data, and analyze it with quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Students who focus their classes on social services will develop basic counseling skills, techniques for program evaluation, and the tools to analyze how public policy affects individuals, families, and communities.

The American Sociological Association also has some excellent resources on the job prospects and career opportunities for our graduates.

Program Requirements

In addition to a strong liberal arts base of classes, our majors are required to take 39 hours of sociology courses. All of our graduates are required to take Introduction to Sociology (1101), Sociological Theory (3431), Sociological Research Methods (3434), and our senior capstone course Senior Seminar (4630).

For students who want to focus their coursework on social services they are also expected to complete: Introduction to Social Services (2232), Practice Skills (3231), Group Dynamics (5140), Social Welfare Policy & Services (4232), and Sociology of the Family (4138)

For a complete overview of all the courses you will need to complete:
Download our check list of required courses.

To see what classes will be offered in the next few years:

Download our schedule of upcoming courses .

Read about our Student Learning Outcomes

I. Mission Statement

The B.S. Sociology program at Georgia Southern University strives to provide students with a thorough and empirically grounded understanding of the social world. Such an approach is founded on a mastery of theory, method, and practice. Sociology majors are given opportunities to develop a sociological imagination as well as the theoretical and analytical skills to evaluate and conduct social research and analysis. Ultimately they will be able to produce original research or apply sociological research to help solve real world problems. Our program is dedicated to empowering students to apply these tools to the social world around them so they can understand and mitigate the social problems and inequalities facing their lives, their local communities, and the global community. The program is dedicated to building sociological knowledge and skills that are applicable to a broad range of settings including the public and private sectors, and advanced academic and professional degrees. Our mission is intertwined with the University’s mission to promote social responsibility and to equip our graduates to be engaged citizens in an increasingly knowledge-intensive and diverse world.

II. Student Learning Outcomes

OBJECTIVE 1: SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE
Sociology majors will be able to clearly articulate a mastery of the sociological perspective and core concepts (i.e., sociological imagination, social structure, social interaction, and inequality), such that majors will be able to demonstrate correct use of sociological perspectives, concepts and vocabulary. That is, B.S. sociology students will be able to explain sociological terms and apply them from a sociological perspective in their analysis of concrete situations.

This learning outcome fits with our mission statement in that competency in objective 1 will result in the development of a student’s sociological imagination (i.e., the ability for a person to see the relationship between their personal situation and their larger social context). Such a sociological imagination allows a person to see how they are tied into their community and, in turn, should give our students the ability and desire to meet the department and university goals that students be “engaged citizens.”

OBJECTIVE 2: THEORY
Sociology majors will understand the role of theory in sociology, such that a student in theory will be able to:

  • A) Define and/or apply theory and describe its role in sociological analysis,
  • B) Compare and contrast basic theoretical orientations.

These outcomes will require B.S. sociology students to have a comprehension of theory that will guide their analytical projects in the “real world.”

The ability to understand the role of theory is specifically mentioned in our mission statement. A theoretically informed student is one who has learned the various ways of interpreting and analyzing social situations. A grasp of sociological theory gives students the intellectual capacity to critically engage with new developments. Be they in a public or private setting, with theoretical knowledge a student will have be able to see particular instances as manifestations of broader patterns. By understanding specific problems in broad terms, students will be able to utilize (and develop) the “best practices” that can be found within their chosen industry. The intellectual skills that allow a person to compare and contrast theoretical orientations will allow one to understand the logics that support various approaches to problems. By understanding these various logics, one should possess the intellectual dexterity to weigh options, understand the positions of those who espouse different solutions, and communicate one’s determination. In short, knowledge of theory, guides the sociological practice that is mentioned in the mission statement.

OBJECTIVE 3: METHODS
Sociology majors will understand the role of evidence and qualitative and quantitative methods in sociology, such that a student in research methods will be able to:

  • A) Identify basic methodological approaches,
  • B) Compare and contrast the basic methodological approaches for gathering data,
  • C) Critically assess a published research report and explain its strengths and weaknesses

Again, our targets are for B.S. sociology students to develop knowledge of sociological methods for collecting and analyzing data and that they will be able to apply these methods and critically assess the sociological research that they will be drawing upon as they practice sociology beyond the academy.

This third set of outcomes matches our mission statement’s stated goals that students will have knowledge of how to conduct research and engage in sociological practice. Understanding of methodology allows one to utilize social research which will allow a student to be a more competent citizen.

 

How do I change my major?

Changing your major is easy. Follow these simple directions. If you have questions or would like help changing your major, contact us at SAM@georgiasouthern.edu or by phone (912) 478-5443 .

 

Select Your Course Focus

Social Services

Do you want to help your community and provide services to families and individuals in crisis? Do you want a career working with children, families, or are you interested in the areas of substance abuse, mental health, or intimate partner violence? With a social service course focus you will be ready to start down a career path that could lead to becoming a program director, non-profit administrator, child protection worker, marriage & family specialist, mental health case manager, victim’s advocate, prevention specialist, community educator, volunteer coordinator, public policy analyst, and many others. If you are interested in earning a Masters of Social Work or continuing your education in counseling, this course focus is ideal.

Your course focus will include Intro to Social Services (Soci2232), Practice Skills for Social Services (Soci3231), Social Welfare Policy and Service (Soci4232), Sociology of the Family (Soci4138), and Groups and Community Action (Soci4130). You are also highly encouraged to take advantage of our internship opportunities to develop your professional skills through Field Instruction (Soci4790)

Society & Culture

This course focus emphasizes developing your “sociological imagination” (i.e. your ability to critically analyze the individual within their larger social setting) as well as hone your researcher skills. For students who want to focus on growing as a scientific researcher this course focus provides you with extensive opportunities and a lot of flexibility to research your particular area of interest.

This is our most broad and inclusive course focus. There are no specialized classes that are recommended for this focus, beyond the base program requirements. If you want to sample a variety of courses or if you would like to tailor your coursework to your individual interests, then this may be the right choice for you.

Life Cycle & Health

This course focus is for students who either want to focus their education on a specific age population or are interested in community health education and promotion. If you want to work with children, the elderly, or promote community health then this is the track for you. This course focus prepares you for a career as a community health educator, home health coordinator, childcare administrator, and many other careers.

If you are interested in gerontology and working with the aging population, you will focus on courses like Sociology of Aging (Soci5135), Death and Dying (Soci3332), and Sociology of Health Care (Soci5139).

If your interest is in child services your courses will focus on Sociology of Childhood (Soci5134) and Child Welfare & Family Services (Soci4231). Combining these specific child services course with the social services course focus would make you a highly marketable student upon graduation.

Your Undergraduate Program Coordinator

Dr. Pidi Zhang Dr. Pidi Zhang
Phone: (912) 478-0004
E-mail: pzhang@georgiasouthern.edu

 

Last updated: 10/13/2016

Department of Sociology & Anthropology • P.O. Box 8051 Statesboro, GA 30460 • (912) 478-5443