CLASS

German: Courses and Outcomes

German Links
Autobahn VerkehrThe courses listed constitute the curriculum for German. The complete catalog description is included. Also consult the General Catalog for additional information. The list includes course prefix & number, title, and description. All classes are three semester (credit) hours unless indicated otherwise. Not all of the courses listed may be offered every semester or even every year (this is especially true of upper-level courses). For upper-level classes in particular see the Course Rotation Schedule. Review the Suggested Study Plan below, and consult a German faculty member and/or your advisor early for planning. Always check for current information with instructors and departments.

Lower-division Courses (1000/2000)
  • GRMN 1001: Elementary German I
    An introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Beginning of a survey of basic German grammar and the development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Some aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. No prerequisite.
  • GRMN 1002: Elementary German II
    The second part of an introduction to the German language and the culture of the German-speaking world. Completion of a survey of basic German grammar and further development of the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing German. Some aspects of everyday life in the German-speaking world will also be introduced. Prerequisite: GRMN 1001 or equivalent.
  • GRMN 1060: Elementary German I & II Combination
    An accelerated introduction to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German and to the culture of German-speaking regions. Completes the elementary levels of German in one semester. No prerequisite.
  • GRMN 2001: Intermediate German I
    Building upon communication skills (understanding, speaking, reading, and writing German), and cultural understanding, developed at the elementary level. Prerequisite: Elementary GRMN 1001 and GRMN 1002 or equivalent.
  • GRMN 2002: Intermediate German II
    Continued focus on communication skills and cultural understanding. Prerequisite: GRMN 2001 or equivalent.
  • GRMN 2060: Intermediate German I & II Combination
    Accelerated intermediate German with continued work on listening, speaking, reading, and writing in German and the culture of German-speaking region. Completes the intermediate levels of German in one semester. Prerequisite: Completion of GRMN 1002 or equivalent.
  • GRMN 2535: German Literature in Translation
    A study of certain major German authors and some of their best works read in translation. Also includes a study of the authors of these works and the literary periods in which they were written. Students may not count this course for credit toward a major or minor in German. [Taught in English. Prerequisites: None.]
Upper-division Courses (3000/4000)

Prerequisites for all 3000 level classes (unless indicated otherwise): GRMN 2002 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

  • GRMN 3030: Selected Topics in German (1-3 credit hours)
    Study of a topic in German literature, culture, society, thought or language not included in the regular offering. Continued development of all five language competencies (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture). May be repeated for credit provided a new topic is studied.
  • GRMN 3130: Conversation & Phonetics
    Vocabulary building and extensive practice of conversational skills in German through conversational settings. Contrastive analysis of the German and English sound systems and extensive oral practice to refine pronunciation.
  • GRMN 3132: German Grammar Review
    Intensive review with extensive practice of German grammar, including advanced aspects.
  • GRMN 3134: Writing in German
    Grammar review, basic instruction in stylistics, and extensive practice in writing, both short compositions and longer items.
  • GRMN 3231: Listening Skills in German
    Presentation and discussion of select songs, radio plays, films, and similar texts and formats. Can be repeated for credit with different content.
  • GRMN 3330: German Language & Society
    Presentation and discussion of various aspects of the German-speaking countries, including history, politics, business, and the arts.

Prerequisites for all 4000 level classes (unless indicated otherwise): two courses at the 3000 level or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

  • GRMN 4030: Selected Topics in German (1-3 credit hours)
    Study of a topic in German literature, culture, society, thought or language not included in the regular offering. Continued development of all five language competencies (listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture). May be repeated for credit provided a new topic is studied.
  • GRMN 4230: Readings in German Literature
    Presentation and discussion of German texts from all periods. Can be repeated for credit with different content.
  • GRMN 4330: German Culture & Civilization
    Presentation and discussion of topics, issues, and events relevant to understanding the German-speaking countries. Can be repeated for credit with different content.
  • GRMN 4790: Internship in German (1-15 credit hours)
    Internship in one or more German-speaking countries. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and department chair.
  • GRMN 4890: Directed Independent Study in German (1-15 credit hours)
    Independent study under faculty supervision.
Suggested Study Plan
We strongly recommend to every student considering German (and any other foreign language, for that matter) to start as early as possible to be able to progress toward the highest level of proficiency. Therefore, we suggest you map a logical and effective course of study with your advisor. Refer to the Course Rotation Schedule below as well. Generally, students may progress as outlined below in their four-year undergraduate study. Assuming no prior knowledge of German, one path toward a B.A. in Modern Languages with a German concentration may look like this:

  • first year: introduction to the German language (GRMN 1001, GRMN 1002)
  • second year: intermediate work (GRMN 2001, GRMN 2002) followed by first 3000 level course(s)
  • third year: courses at the 3000 level, and the first 4000 level course(s)
  • fourth year: advanced work in 4000 level courses.

Begin with several 3000-level classes before advancing to 4000-level classes (as a matter of fact, two courses at the 3000 level are required to enroll in 4000 level courses; exceptions may be granted). Note that there is no fixed progression in terms of course numbers, that is, there is no GRMN 3001 followed by GRMN 3002 etc. Enroll for the course at the appropriate level. Naturally, the core curriculum has to be completed as well. Students will find a stay abroad just before, during, or after the third year the most beneficial to their progress.

The following courses are third-year skills-building courses (naturally, these skills are not exclusive). All courses involve cultural and critical thinking aspects.

  • reading: GRMN 3330 (“German Language and Society”)
  • listening: GRMN 3231 (“Listening Skills in German”)
  • speaking: GRMN 3130 (“German Conversation and Phonetics”)
  • writing: GRMN 3134 (“Writing in German”)

The following upper-level courses should be considered required for a major. Any part may be waived if unusual situations warrant such action.

  • “German Grammar Review” (GRMN 3132) or “Writing in German” (GRMN 3134)
  • “German Conversation and Phonetics” GRMN 3130) or “Listening Skills in German” (GRMN 3231; repeatable)
  • One culture course [“Germany Language and Society” (GRMN 3330) or “German Culture and Civilization” (GRMN 4330; repeatable)]
  • One literature course [“Readings in German Literature” (GRMN 4230; repeatable)].
Course Rotation Schedule
Every regular semester, we offer the full lower-division Elementary German and Intermediate German sequence (at least one GRMN 1001, GRMN 1002, GRMN 2001, and GRMN 2002). In addition, there are three upper-division courses (3000/4000-level). These will rotate according to the pattern below. All other upper-division courses listed in the curriculum will be scheduled as appropriate and possible. Circumstances might necessitate changes such as substitutions. Due to the three-term rotation, “Term” does not refer to specific semesters or years, e.g. Term A is not necessarily the Fall semester of an even numbered year. Note that there are no German courses offered on campus during summer term(s).

Term A Readings in Literature (GRMN 4230)
German Language & Society (GRMN 3330)
Conversation & Phonetics (GRMN 3130)
Term B German Culture & Civilization (GRMN 4330)
Grammar Review (GRMN 3132)
Readings in German Literature (GRMN 4230)
Term C German Culture & Civilization (GRMN 4330)
Listening Skills in German (GRMN 3231)
Writing in German (GRMN 3134)
Term D Term A returns
Outcomes
The goal of the German program is to help the student achieve the highest possible level of proficiency in the language as well as to lead to cultural understanding and critical thinking. Every course will enable students to communicate on selected topics and in appropriate situations at the indicated level of proficiency, demonstrating varying degrees of mastery of selected vocabulary items and grammatical structures and concepts.

A student just starting out in the language is at the Novice Low level. GRMN 1001, 1002, 2001 and 2002 are designed to help the student reach the Intermediate Low level by the end of GRMN 2002. For students who continue to upper division courses, the goals are Intermediate Mid (minimum; target is Intermediate High) for the Minor (15 credit hours), and Intermediate High (minimum; target is Advanced Low) for the Major (24 credit hours). Or else as far as possible…

Goals and targets by level:

Level Goal Target
1000 Novice High Intermediate Low
2000 Intermediate Low Intermediate Mid
3000 Intermediate Mid Intermediate High
4000 Intermediate High Advanced Low

Note that course title, text book description and proficiency terminology are not the same; “intermediate” as course title means something different than “intermediate” in terms of proficiency level. Likewise, course grades and proficiency levels are not correlated, that is, for example “C” does not imply “intermediate mid”. Also, an “intermediate [proficiency] level” textbook may be perfectly suitable for an “advanced [curriculum] course”.

For more information, refer to the  ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines.

Tools of the Trade

1. General Materials

Georgia Southern’s Henderson Library holds several volumes related to the study of German, including a variety of professional journals, newspapers, and magazines. Modern technology makes access to materials not available on location easy. There is also a small departmental library (1303 Forest Drive) where you can read books, newspapers, get together with others for review and study sessions, etc.

2. A German Grammar Book

Gerda Dippmann & Johanna Watzinger-Tharp, A Practical Review of German Grammar. Prentice Hall. 3rd edition (or later).

3. An English/German or German/English Dictionary

Any “Standard”-size dictionary. Because there are various similar, excellent ones by different publishers we do not prescribe a particular text (ask a faculty member for specific recommendations if you wish). However, when selecting a text consider the following criteria:

  • The latest update and thorough revision (not the same as copyright date) should be within the last three years (definitely after August 2006). You find this information on the inside of the book, on the copyright page.
  • “Standard” means it should contain 125,000 words (or something like that, rather more than fewer; such a number is often mentioned on book covers). They typically cost about $40.
OPTIONAL – If you are really serious (majors)

1. A German/German Dictionary

These books are like a thesaurus, meaning the terms are explained in German (and not translated). However, they have been written for language learners (as opposed to native speakers). There are different types by different publishers; ask a faculty member for specific recommendations if interested. In general, there are two types:

  • Comprehensive, full-size books for advanced students.
  • Books written for an “intermediate” level learner. Explanations are in less challenging language, and they are not as comprehensive.

Ask/Look for “Wörterbuch Deutsch als Fremdsprache”, this should yield the best results. Pons (Klett), Hueber, Langenscheidt, deGruyter are some of the better-known publishers. The first two offer two versions of such dictionaries. The latter are the biggies (and cost accordingly more, too).

2. A complete German/English or English/German Dictionary

As above, but “complete” or “unabridged” (terminology varies), and thus very comprehensive. They tend to cost around $50 and up.

German Course Links

Last updated: 4/4/2016

Department of Foreign Languages • PO Box 8081 • Statesboro, GA 30460 • (912) 478-5281 • Fax (912) 478-0652