CLASS

Welcome!

The Department of Communication Arts, the largest department in the College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences, provides a forum through which students can develop life skills such as confidence in oral and written presentations, communication skills, and critical analysis and problem solving skills. Students in the Department represent a broad spectrum of majors, interests, and career possibilities in Communication Arts, Communication Studies, Multimedia Film & Production, Multimedia Journalism, Public Relations, and Theatre.  They work together and with faculty on research projects, state-of-the-art productions, events, online news outlets, and broadcasts.

Communication Arts Faculty

GlobeSummer 2015 Study Abroad opportunities to Montepulciano, Italy, with Dr. Bourland-Davis and London, England, with Prof. Groover. Click here for more information.
W_Kent_MurrayIt is with a heavy heart the Department of Communication Arts shares the passing of Professor Kent Murray. Murray has been with the department since 1985 & will be very much missed.During A Day for Southern consider giving to the Kent Murray TV Studio fund to name our new Sanford TV studio after Kent. The studio is a new facility he dreamed of and planned for over the past 30 years. He designed the current facility, but unfortunately, did not get to teach in it.  #3736 http://president.georgiasouthern.edu/advancement/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/GivingOpportunities.pdfPhoto from
http://media.morristechnology.com/mediafilesvr/upload/connectstatesboro/article/W_Kent_Murray.jpg

 

Attention Students:

As you are registering for your Fall 2014 classes, keep the following changes in mind:

JOUR — now under either MMJ or COMM

MMC — now under either MMFP or COMM

Upcoming Events:

 raceweb

   Race; a Play   by David Mamet         Directed by Lisa L. Abbott

   Sept. 24 – Oct. 1          Black Box Theatre, Center for Art & Theatre

   Race explores the tension between perception and intent when a law firm of three attorneys, two black and one white, defend a
white man charged with a crime against a black woman. Thought provoking and challenging, THIS PLAY IS RECCOMEDNED FOR
MATURE AUDIENCES DUE TO CONTENT AND LANGUAGE.

  contact the box office at 478-5379 for reservations.

 “You’re white.” – “Is that a crime?” – “In this instance.”

This production is not a statement about race in the larger context of society but a case study, presented by a playwright who has functioned as a provocateur for much of his career. We look at a singular instance where race and the perception of race impact the lives of the people involved.  From a controversial point of view Mamet examines race in the context of the justice system, business, and gender. However, be aware that Mamet is not trying to answer any questions about the role of race in our society, he is asking you to think, react, and respond.

Racism is a cultural issue, a public policy issue, a complicated issue.  It is not an issue that can be resolved purely through individual actions; it is an issue that must be addressed at a public policy level. To move toward change at that level, we must start the conversation. As we have been exploring this play the cast has discussed guilt and innocence, privilege and perception, and the power dynamics of both race and gender. We have discovered both the challenge and the pleasure of open and honest discussions of this topic Mamet claims cannot be discussed.

Race is a part of our world, ignoring the complexities of race, gender, age, and class do not make the issues disappear, rather they allow them to fester, to explode and to damage.

A note on the language. Language is a powerful tool and Mamet uses it to destroy your comfort level. To make you squirm. Being uncomfortable forces us to examine that which is making us feel that way. Hopefully that will lead us to discussions of the issues raised, discoveries over the meanings of words, the power of words to frame reality. As pointed out to the cast by Sociologist, Dr. Nathan Palmer, privilege allows us the power of framing reality. These lawyers are not arguing over the guilt or innocence of their client but the framing of reality.

The goal of the cast and crew is that you, our audience walk away tonight engaged in a discussion. That you examine your own prejudices. Think about how you frame reality in your use of language or your acceptance, rejection, or choice to ignore or minimize the issue of race in our culture. If we make you mad, make you think, and make you question then we have done our job.

 

 SPECIAL OPPORTUNITY FOR RACE – POST SHOW DISCUSSIONS MODERATED BY SOCIOLOGISY PROFESSOR NATHAN PALMER THURSDAY, SEPT. 25, FRIDAY, SEPT. 26, AND WEDNESDAY, OCT.1 IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING THE PERFORMANCE. ATTENDANCE VERIFICATION FOLLOWING TALK BACK.  the show runs 75 minutes without intermission and the postshow discussion will follow 10 minutes after curtain.

Congratulations

Congratulations to Christian Washington and Mallory Taylor. They won an award for a video they produced for the Adobe Challenge Competition.

 

News:

Communication Arts alumni named to the 40 Under 40 Class of 2014

 

 

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Communication Arts Department • PO Box 8091; Statesboro, GA 30460 • (912) 478-5138 • commarts@georgiasouthern.edu